header

About

My book, the Guide To Getting It On, is about sex. So why would the website for the book be about sex, sports and nature? Because after writing about sex for the past 20 years, I need to mix it up, and these are some of the things I enjoy. So while the book is about sex, the website is about sex, sports, nature and anything else that catches my eye on any given day.

Dr. Paul Joannides and his assistant, Woody the beagle.

 

Paul Joannides, Psy.D. is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst. He is the author of the Guide To Getting It On, an award-winning book on sex that is used in dozens of college sex-education courses and has won praise in Rolling Stone, Playboy and Oprah Magazine.

Paul has been on the editorial boards of the Journal of Sexual Medicine and the American Journal of Sexuality Education. He was presented with the 2014 Professional Standard of Excellence Award by the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists.

Paul is the author of  The Challenging Landscape of Problematic Sexual Behaviors, Including ‘Sexual Addiction’ and ‘Hypersexuality’ in New Directions in Sex Therapy, 2nd edition, (Kleinplatz) and The Luxury of Intersectionality in Taking Sides: Clashing Views in Human Sexuality (McKee, Gilbert and Galarza).

Paul created the 90 Seconds on Sex series for Playboy/Sirius Radio. He writes on sex for Psychology Today Blogs. The NCAA approved Paul to speak to college athletes on sexuality as part of their speaker’s grant program. The college campuses he has spoken at include Dartmouth, Yale, Tufts, Lehigh, Rice, Middlebury, East Carolina University, North Carolina State University and the University of California at Santa Barbara. Paul has given the opening keynote address for the CFLE-Planned Parenthood National Sex Education Conference and the Oregon Adolescent Sexuality Conference.

The illustrations used on this site are from the Guide To Getting It On. The illustrator is the incomparable Daerick Gross Sr.

This site embraces the following beliefs (in no particular order):

—An emphasis on pleasure rather than disease.
—Mutual consent is the foundation for good sex.
—A willingness to explore your own body, to learn as much as you can about it, and to give helpful feedback to your partners.
—A desire to learn about your partner’s body, to ask about what feels good and what doesn’t, and to value feedback when it is given to you.
—Respect for people who have a different sexual orientation than your own.
—Using a hassle-free form of birth control such as the IUD,
—Using condoms when you are at risk for giving or getting sexually-transmitted infections.
—Exasperation that we’ve spent $2 billion on “abstinence-only” sex education, which is a lot of money spent on shame and lies.

UA-61800791-1